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Open Educational Resources

5 R's of OER

The term “open content” describes any copyrightable work (traditionally excluding software, which is described by other terms like “open source”) that is licensed in a manner that provides users with free and perpetual permission to engage in the 5R activities:

  1. Retain – the right to make, own, and control copies of the content
  2. Reuse – the right to use the content in a wide range of ways (e.g., in a class, in a study group, on a website, in a video)
  3. Revise – the right to adapt, adjust, modify, or alter the content itself (e.g., translate the content into another language)
  4. Remix – the right to combine the original or revised content with other open content to create something new (e.g., incorporate the content into a mashup)
  5. Redistribute – the right to share copies of the original content, your revisions, or your remixes with others (e.g., give a copy of the content to a friend)

The Licenses Explained

  Image Description
Attribution
CC BY
CC-BY button.png This license lets others distribute, remix, tweak, and build upon the work, even commercially, as long as they credit the creator for the original creation. This is the most flexible and accommodating of the available Creative Commons licenses. Recommended for maximum dissemination and use of licensed materials.
Attribution-NoDerivs
CC BY-ND
CC-BY-ND Button.png This license allows for redistribution, commercial and non-commercial, as long as the licensed work is passed along unchanged and in whole, with credit to the creator.
Attribution-NonCommercial
CC BY-NC
CC-BY-NC Button.png This license lets others remix, tweak, and build upon the work non-commercially, and although their new works must also acknowledge the creator and be non-commercial, they don’t have to license their derivative works on the same terms.
Attribution-ShareAlike
CC BY-SA
CC-SA button.png This license lets others remix, tweak, and build upon the work even for commercial purposes, as long as they credit the creator and license all new creations under the identical terms. This license is often compared to “copyleft” free and open source software licenses. All new works based on yours will carry the same license, so any derivatives will also allow commercial use. This is the license used by Wikipedia, and is recommended for materials that would benefit from incorporating content from Wikipedia and similarly licensed projects.
Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike
CC BY-NC-SA
CC-BY-NC-SA button.png This license lets others remix, tweak, and build upon your work non-commercially, as long as they credit the creator and license their new creations under the identical terms.
Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs
CC BY-NC-ND
CC-BY-NC-ND button.png This license is the most restrictive of the six main licenses, only allowing others to download your works and share them with others as long as they credit the creator, but they can’t change them in any way or use them commercially.

License Text and Icons by Creative Commons Organization and is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Creative Common License Chooser

https://creativecommons.org/choose/ walks you through the process of choosing a license with the features you want. It also lets you enter metadata that will help others provide attribution to you when they reuse your work.  

At the end of the process you have an image and text that you can copy/paste, as well as machine-readable code that you can add to a website.

Attribution Builder

How to Build an Attribution - Use the Attribution Builder

http://www.openwa.org/open-attrib-builder/
prompts you to enter the information needed for a  well-written attribution.

After you enter the information, this tool generates an attribution that you can copy/paste, as well as html code that you can add to a website.