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Plagiarism & Documentation Resources - Sellersburg: Plagiarism Policy

Plagiarism & Documentation Resources

What does the Ivy Tech Code of Student Rights and Responsibilities say about plagiarism?  Here is a definition of plagiarism from section IIA of the Code:

"Plagiarism : Presenting within one’s own work the ideas, representations, or words of another person without customary and proper acknowledgment of that person’s authorship is considered plagiarism. Students who are unsure of what constitutes plagiarism should consult with their instructors. Claims of ignorance will not necessarily excuse the offense."

In simpler terms, plagiarism is passing off someone else's work as your own.  For example:

 

  • If you borrow or buy a paper from a friend and turn it in with your name on it, that's plagiarism.
  • If you copy a paper from the Internet (or a magazine or any other source) and turn it in with your name on it, that's plagiarism.
  • If you use ideas from a source (a book, magazine, website, etc.) and don't indicate or document the source they're from, that's plagiarism.
  • If you copy material from a source and don't put the words inside quotation marks, that's plagiarism.

Intentional Plagiarism

Sometimes students plagiarize intentionally.  They run out of time to complete an assignment or they're worried about their ability to complete an assignment successfully or they get lazy, and they copy information from a source. 

Obviously, intentional plagiarism is a serious academic offense, and students who commit this type of offense face serious academic consequences.

Unintentional Plagiarism

Sometimes students plagiarize unintentionally.  They don't have a great deal of practice at paraphrasing and documenting correctly, and they make errors.

When unintentional plagiarism occurs, it can represent a learning opportunity for students -- a time to seek help from the instructor and additional information about documentation styles and how to use them appropriately.

Please note, though, that even unintentional plagiarism can result in serious academic consequences - depending on the specific context within which the plagiarism occurs.

Plagiarism and Academic Misconduct

A. Academic Misconduct, Academic Integrity & Professional Behavior

Academic misconduct is defined as any activity that undermines the academic integrity of the institution. Faculty members are responsible for maintaining the academic integrity of the institution. Academic integrity is expected of all students. Faculty and the college may sanction a student for academic misconduct.

Ivy Tech recognizes academic integrity as a fundamental principle of collegiate life. The credibility of the college’s educational programs rests upon the foundation of student learning and integrity. Students who misrepresent their academic work violate the rights of their fellow students and undermine the faculty member’s authority and ability to assess learning.

Faculty members are also responsible for determining appropriate and professional behavior connected with academic course work associated with clinical, field, or internship experiences off college property. Further, some academic programs have additional student responsibilities associated with them that may be based upon accreditation standards and professional standards, as well as compliance with federal and state laws.

The college, therefore, views any act of academic dishonesty or unprofessional behavior as a serious offense requiring disciplinary measures, including failure for the exam or specific course work, course failure, removal from an academic program, suspension, and expulsion from the college. In addition, an act of academic dishonesty may have unforeseen effects and lead to a formal process outside the college.

Violations of academic integrity and professional behavior include, but are not limited to, the following acts:

1. Cheating: Unauthorized use of notes or study aids, or acquiring information from another student’s papers, on an examination; obtaining a copy of an examination or questions from an exam prior to taking the exam; altering graded work with the intent to deceive another person to do one’s work and then submitting as one’s own name; allowing another to take an examination in one’s name; submitting identical or similar papers for credit in more than one course without obtaining prior permission from the instructors of all the courses involved.

2. Aiding Cheating or Other Acts of Academic Dishonesty: Providing material or information to another student with the knowledge that this material or information will be used to deceive faculty.

3. Plagiarism: Presenting within one’s own work the ideas, representations, or words of another person without customary and proper acknowledgment of that person’s authorship is considered plagiarism. Students who are unsure of what constitutes plagiarism should consult with their instructors. Claims of ignorance will not necessarily excuse the offense.

4. Data Misrepresentation: Fabricating data; deliberately presenting in an assignment data that were not gathered in accordance with assigned guidelines or are deliberately fabricated; or providing an inaccurate account of the method by which the data were gathered and generated.

5. Falsification of Academic Records or Documents: Falsification of academic records or documents includes, but is not limited to, altering any documents affecting academic records; forging signatures or falsifying information of an official academic document such as a grade report, ID card, library card, or any other official college letter or communication, will constitute academic dishonesty. 

6. Unauthorized Access to Computerized Academic or Administrative Records or Systems: Unauthorized access to computerized academic or administrative records or systems means viewing or altering the college’s computer records without authorization; copying or modifying the college’s computer programs or systems without authorization; releasing or dispensing information gained through unauthorized access; or interfering with the use or availability of computer systems or information. Also, when college-sponsored activities are held at locations owned or managed by other institutions or organizations, the unauthorized use, viewing, copying or altering of those institutions’ computer records, systems, or programs would similarly constitute a violation of academic integrity. 

7. Unprofessional or Inappropriate Behavior within a Clinical, Field, or Internship Experience: Conduct that is considered to be lewd, indecent, obscene, inappropriate, and/or non-compliant with professional or accreditation standards; or a violation of clinical or other affiliated site expectations or guidelines; or a violation of federal or state laws.

 

 

Additional Resources

For additional information on how to avoid plagiarism, please see the following websites: